MONDAY NIGHT SEMINAR We Interrupt This Program: Indigenous Media Tactics in Canada

MONDAY NIGHT SEMINAR We Interrupt This Program: Indigenous Media Tactics in Canada

The “Monday Night Seminar” carries on the tradition of Marshall McLuhan’s public seminars at the University of Toronto. All seminars take place from 6 – 8pm within the same intimate Coach House setting where McLuhan once held court. In this up-close and personal environment, a range of thinkers – academics, activists, scientists, artists, designers and planners – will explore digital culture from a feminist perspective.

The Monday Night Seminars are designed to challenge prevailing cultural notions about technology and provoke new insight on the possibilities for a more equitable technological future. Join us!


Monday Night Seminar April 9th: We Interrupt This Program: Indigenous Media Tactics in Canada

Join us as at the book launch and discussion for “We Interrupt This Program: Indigenous Media Tactics in Canada“, with authors John H.M. Kelly and Miranda Brady, along with special guest,  Terril Calder.

The book will be available for purchase at the event for $28.00, the link to the description is posted below.

https://www.ubcpress.ca/we-interrupt-this-program.

Click here to visit the eventbrite page!

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Dr. Miranda Brady, Associate Professor in Communication Studies at Carleton University and Co-director of the Centre for Indigenous Research, Culture, Language, and Education (CIRCLE)

Miranda J. Brady is an associate professor in Communication Studies and a Co-director of the Centre for Indigenous Research, Culture, Language, and Education (CIRCLE). She holds a Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University in Mass Communication with a minor in Social Thought.

Dr. Brady’s work takes a critical/cultural approach and explores the construction of identity in the media and other highly mediated cultural institutions like museums. In particular, her focus is on race and ethnicity with an emphasis on Indigenous identity. Dr. Brady’s current research projects explore Indigenous activism and media in the 1970s and 1980s. She is also working with the Akwesasne Mohawk Nation’s Native North American Travelling College on projects related to mobilizing traditional knowledge for community well-being. Finally, Brady is active in CIRCLE’s many activities on campus, including an annual student conference on Indigenous and indigenist research (usually in March).

Dr. John M.H. Kelly, CIRCLE Co-Director, Adjunct Professor at Carleton University 

John M.H. Kelly, directed the Centre for Aboriginal Education, Research and Culture (CAERC) in 2002 after he accepted the position at Carleton. The next year, John and musicologist Elaine Keillor founded and co-directed CIRCLE, which combined CAERC’s research functions with the Centre for First Peoples’ Music and Research, the Canadian Musical Heritage Society and the Centre for Canadian Cultures and Heritages.

John is Haida from Skidegate Village in Haida Gwaii, a group of lush, rain-forested North Pacific islands about 80 km off the coast of British Columbia, a 1,750 kilometre road trip from Victoria. The journey is much shorter by the ocean-faring canoes of his rugged ancestors.

John has worked to support Indigenous languages, cultures and education in Canada and the United States since 1993. He earned his doctorate in education from Oregon State University in 2000. John’s work includes co-investigator, editor and a writer for four of CIRCLE’s research project Web publications funded by the Department of Canadian Heritage and other organizations. These are Native Drums (www.native-drums.ca), Native Dance(www.native-dance.ca), Path of the Elders (www.pathoftheelders.com) and First Encounters (www.firstencounters.ca). He also co-authored with Elaine Keillor and Timothy Archambault, The Encyclopedia of Native American Music of North America (Santa Barbara, Calif,: Greenwoood Press, 2013). He is co-author with Miranda Brady of a book, Indigenous Interventions: Studies in History, Media, Image and Discourse.  The book is undergoing revisions under contract to UBC Press.

Among numerous committees, grant adjudication boards and other activities, John is one of 15 researchers the Department of Canadian Heritage designated as Canada’s leading authorities on language and cultural revitalization. In 2004, this Circle of Experts worked with a 10-member Task Force to design a national languages strategy to perpetuate aboriginal languages in Canada.

Terril Calder, Independent Film Director

Is a Métis artist, born in Fort Frances, Ontario, Canada currently residing in Toronto. She attended The University of Manitoba’s Fine Art Program as a Drawing major with a focus on Performance Art (with Sharen Alward) & Film Studies (with George Toles). While in Winnipeg she was a member of Video Pool and it was there she was awarded training in video production. Calder exhibited her Sculpture and Performance Art work with the notorious Student Bolshevik group until leaving for Toronto in 1992. In Toronto Calder joined the Shake Well Performance Art collective in various exhibitions that led her to a group that became the founding members of the 7a*11d International Performance Art festival in Toronto, Canada. There she curated Visual and Performance Art exhibitions under their umbrella organization. In 2000 Calder received training in 3-D Computer Animation. She has lectured and taught art through the years with various organizations that include the National Ballet School of Canada, Art in the Park program, The University of Manitoba, Indigenous Roots and in the ImagineNATIVE’s Cultural Exchange Program with South Africa. Her work has strongly influenced many Indigenous filmmakers and a new genera in film; Spotted Fawn aka Amanda Strong and Michelle Latimer were both mentored and/or assisted by Terril in their animated work. Compelled by the love of Hybrid Media and Fusion Art she currently experiments with the amalgamation in her Stop Frame Animated films that she writes, directs, crafts and animates. The films screen Nationally and Internationally and have received attention. Most notably an Honorable Mention at The Sundance Film Festival and at Berlinale a Canadian Genie Award Nomination as well as TIFF’s top ten list in 2011 for “Choke” a short she animated and co-created with Michelle Latimer. In 2016 she was awarded the Ontario Arts Council’s K.M Hunter award for her work in Media Arts.

Monday Night Seminar: Shame Shame Shame (refresh)

Monday Night Seminar: Shame Shame Shame (refresh)

The “Monday Night Seminar” carries on the tradition of Marshall McLuhan’s public seminars at the University of Toronto. All seminars take place from 6 – 8pm within the same intimate Coach House setting where McLuhan once held court. In this up-close and personal environment, a range of thinkers – academics, activists, scientists, artists, designers and planners – will explore digital culture from a feminist perspective.

The Monday Night Seminars are designed to challenge prevailing cultural notions about technology and provoke new insight on the possibilities for a more equitable technological future. Join us!

Monday Night Seminar March 19th: Shame Shame Shame (refresh)

Join us as we discuss the media logics of shame with Wendy Hui Kyong Chun and Susanna Paasonen.

Please visit our Eventbrite to get your ticket by clicking here.

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Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Professor of Modern Culture and Media, Brown University

Dr. Chun has studied both Systems Design Engineering and English Literature, which she combines and mutates in her current work on digital media. She is author of Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics (MIT, 2006), Programmed Visions: Software and Memory (MIT 2011), and Updating to Remain the Same: Habitual New Media (MIT 2016). She is co-editor (with Tara McPherson and Patrick Jagoda) of a special issue of American Literature entitled New Media and American Literature, co-editor (with Lynne Joyrich) of a special issue of Camera Obscura entitled Race and/as Technology and co-editor (with Anna Fisher and Thomas Keenan) of New Media, Old Media: A History and Theory Reader, 2nd edition (forthcoming Routledge, 2015).  She was a 2016 Guggenheim Fellow, ACLS and American Academy of Berlin Fellow, and she has been a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton), a Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard and a Wriston Fellow at Brown. She has been the Velux Visiting Professor of Management, Politics and Philosophy at the Copenhagen Business School; the Wayne Morse Chair for Law and Politics at the University of Oregon, Visiting Professor at Leuphana University (Luneburg, Germany), Visiting Associate Professor in the History of Science Department at Harvard, of which she is currently an Associate. She is currently working on a project entitled “Discriminating Data: Individuals, Neighbours, Proxies.”

Susanna Paasonen, chair of the department of Media Studies, University of Turku

 

Dr. Paasonen’s research interests focus on media culture: more specifically, on internet research, popular culture, sexuality, pornography and theories of affect. After finishing her PhD at the University of Turku in 2002, she worked as a lecturer in Media Culture at the University of Tampere, as a postdoctoral researcher in Gender Studies at the University of Turku, as a research fellow at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies (University of Helsinki), and as a senior research associate and professor of Digital Culture at the University of Jyväskylä before starting in her current post in 2011. She spent part of her research leave of 2015-2016 as visiting scholar at MIT and Microsoft Research New England’s Social Media Collective.

Dr. Paasonen’s research has appeared in journals such as Feminist Theory, European Journal of Cultural Studies, International Journal of Cultural Studies, Childhood, Velvet Light Trap, Sex Education, Somatechnics, Television & New Media, Communications and Critical Studies in Media Communication. She serves on the editorial boards of e.g. the journals SexualitiesPorn StudiesNew Media & SocietySocial Media & SocietyInternational Journal of Cultural Studies and Journal of Scandinavian Cinema as well as on the board of The Association of Cultural Studies.

Her current book-length projects look at the notion of objectification; distraction and boredom connected to networked media, as well as feminist tactics in social media. She is author of the forthcoming Many Splendored Things: Thinking Sex and Play (Goldsmiths Press) and Not Safe for Work: Sex, Humor, and Risk in Social Media (with Kylie Jarrett and Ben Light, MIT Press). Her previous book projects include Carnal Resonance: Affect and Online Pornography (MIT Press 2011) as well as the edited anthologies Networked Affect (with Ken Hillis and Michael Petit, MIT Press 2015), Working with Affect in Feminist Readings: Disturbing Differences(with Marianne Liljeström, Routledge 2010) and Pornification: Sex and Sexuality in Media Culture (with Kaarina Nikunen and Laura Saarenmaa, Berg 2007).

Monday Night Seminar: Glitching the Code of the Techno-Logic: The NO!!!BOT

Monday Night Seminar: Glitching the Code of the Techno-Logic: The NO!!!BOT

The “Monday Night Seminar” carries on the tradition of Marshall McLuhan’s public seminars at the University of Toronto. All seminars take place from 6 – 8pm within the same intimate Coach House setting where McLuhan once held court. In this up-close and personal environment, a range of thinkers – academics, activists, scientists, artists, designers and planners – will explore digital culture from a feminist perspective.

The Monday Night Seminars are designed to challenge prevailing cultural notions about technology and provoke new insight on the possibilities for a more equitable technological future. Join us!

Monday Night Seminar March 12th: Glitching the Code of the Techno-Logic: The NO!!!BOT

The NO!!!BOT is a performance that glitches the dizzying code of the Cult of the Techno-Logic. It is impossible desire, a body bypassing the supersonic technological rail driving us deeper into a militarized neo-colonial hell. It opens up collective imaginaries for hacking destructive code makers, and generating our own deviant electric dreams.

With special guest Praba Pilar.

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Praba Pilar, Performance Artist

Praba Pilar is a diasporic Colombian artist keen on disrupting the overwhelmingly passive participation in the contemporary ‘cult of the techno-logic.’ After extensive travels and erstwhile lives in Colombia, Mexico, India, Spain, Greece and the United States, she now resides in Winnipeg, Canada.

Over the last two decades Pilar has presented cultural productions integrating performance art, street theatre, electronic installations, digital works, video, websites, and writing. These projects have traveled widely to museums, galleries, universities, performance festivals, conferences, public streets, and radio airwaves around the world, and include BOT I, the Church of Nano Bio Info Cogno; the Cyborg Soap Opera; Computers Are A Girl’s Best Friend; Cyber.Labia; El World Brain Disorder; Humaquina: Manifest Tech-Destiny; Techno-Promesas: Putografia Virtual; Global Warmaquina; Edu-Maquina: De-Educacion; Webopticon: Arquitectura of Control and the Hexterminators.

While in Winnipeg, she has performed at MAWA’s Feminist Art Throwdown, at the Atomic Center, exhibited electronic installations and digital prints at the Atomic Center, Urban Shaman Gallery and MAWA, moderated panels on biotechnological art, given artists talks and university lectures, mentored numerous artists, helped launch the BioArt issue of ArtLink Magazine, and presented her own radio programming on CKUW 95.9FM. She is actively developing a new body of work on ideology, interpellation and unintelligibility titled Enigma Symbiotica, while covertly embarked on an all-encompassing post-human interdisciplinary journey with artist Anuj Vaidya titled Larval Rock Stars.

Pilar is the recipient of numerous awards, including a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Digital Humanities and New Media with the Hub for Innovative Exchange at the University of Winnipeg, the UC Davis Presidential Pre-Doctoral Fellowship, the Puffin Foundation Award, the Creative Capital Award, the Creative Work Fund Award, and the Potrero Nuevo Fund Award and two nominations for a Rockefeller Award.  Her most recent writing has been featured in the Lateral Journal of the Cultural Studies Association, the Dance CurrentKATALOGlocalfluxWEAD Magazineh+Magazine and the chapter “A Performance Script in Two Parts” in the forthcoming book:  Are All The Women Still White: Globalizing Women’s Studies, Eds. Janell Hobson and Ime Kerlee (SUNY Press 2016). Her work has been written about in cTheory magazine; in the books Multispecies Salon, edited by Eben Kirksey (2014), Latin American Identity in Online Cultural Production, by Claire Taylor and Thea Pitman (2013); Body As Evidence: Mediating Race, Globalizing Gender, by Janell Hobson (2013), TechKnowledgies: New Imaginaries and Transmigrations in the Humanites, Arts and TechnoSciences, edited by Mary Valentis (2007); in Naked on the Internet, by Audacia Ray (2007); and in The Civil Disobedience Handbook: A Brief History and Practical Advice for the Politically Disenchanted, edited by James Tracy (2002).  She was featured in a book on inspirational women by Cathleen Rountree, On Women Turning Thirty: Making Choices, Finding Meaning (2000).

Monday Night Seminar: Lurk Over Here: Digital Bystander Culture

Monday Night Seminar: Lurk Over Here: Digital Bystander Culture

The “Monday Night Seminar” carries on the tradition of Marshall McLuhan’s public seminars at the University of Toronto. This year’s thematic is MsUnderstanding Media.  All seminars take place from 6 – 8pm within the same intimate Coach House setting where McLuhan once held court. In this up-close and personal environment, a range of thinkers – academics, activists, scientists, artists, designers and planners – will explore digital culture from a feminist perspective.

The Monday Night Seminars are designed to challenge prevailing cultural notions about technology and provoke new insight on the possibilities for a more equitable technological future. Join us!

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Monday Night Seminar February 26: Lurk Over Here: Digital Bystander Culture

With special guests Carrie Rentschler (McGill University), Wendy Kiomotis (METRAC), and Andrea Slane (UOIT).

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Andrea Slane: Associate Professor, Legal Studies; Associate Dean, Research and Graduate Programs, Faculty of Social Science and Humanities, University of Ontario Institute of Technology.

Dr. Andrea Slane is Associate Dean, Research, and Associate Professor in Legal Studies, Faculty of Social Science and Humanities, University of Ontario Institute of Technology.  Her research focusses on law’s interface with digital communication technologies.  She has published articles on the nature of privacy interests in sexual images, and on the appropriate limits to privacy protection online, including information sharing between Internet Service Providers and police.  She has also published on legal approaches to various forms of sexual and other online exploitation of vulnerable people, especially children and youth.  A further strain of Dr. Slane’s research deals with personality rights and other efforts to use intellectual property to protect personal information.  Her current research examines novel claims rooted in data protection, privacy, or personality rights that aim to protect a person’s identity in complex information environments, and the responsibilities of various online business models to protect these interests.

Carrie Rentschler: Associate Professor and William Dawson Scholar of Feminist Media Studies

Professor Rentschler’s research examines the relationship between media making, social movement activism, and the construction of new political subjectivities.  She studies this relationship in the context of movements against gender and racial violence, experiences of victimization and social trauma, and structures of feminist organizing online and via social media. Her current book project analyzes the 60-year cultural history of the bystander as an agent of change, with a particular focus on the media practices that have come to define bystander intervention. Her other current research examines the shape and practice of contemporary feminisms in social media networks and hashtag publics, the role of humour in feminist organizing and media making, and feminist uses of social media to disrupt rape culture. She is a member of FemTechNet and FemBot, two feminist collectives whose members collaboratively teach, research and develop new models of open-access teaching and scholarly publication, respectively.  She is also a lead researcher on a major SSHRC Partnership Grant about responses to rape culture on university campuses. Her research is supported by funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Fonds Québécoise de la Recherche sur la Société et Culture, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Media@McGill, the William Dawson Scholar fund and seed grants from McGill University.

 

Log Out! Worker Resistance Within and Against the Platform Economy

Log Out! Worker Resistance Within and Against the Platform Economy

International conference, McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology, University of Toronto

March 6, 2018 – 10:00am – 6:00pm

Emerging waves of struggles in sectors such as logistics, food delivery, journalism, and other platform-based sites of labour are showing how workers resist the casualized and precarious work conditions of the digital economy. Uber, Deliveroo, Amazon, Instagram, and many other platform-based corporations are experiencing worker refusal, organizing and struggle. Their algorithmic power is coupled with the material command over workers’ bodies, time and space. Yet while technology is used to intensify and subdue labour, it is also constantly met with resistance from workers. This will be key in future processes of liberation, as workers challenge the patterns shaped by the platform and unionize or organize for improved conditions, higher wages, predictable scheduling, and better benefits.

Speakers:
Enda Brophy and Seamus Grayer (Simon Fraser University)
Callum Cant (University of West London)
Julie Yujie Chen (University of Leicester)
Alessandro Delfanti (University of Toronto)
Nick Dyer-Witheford (Western University)
Alessandro Gandini (King’s College)
Lilly Irani (University of California San Diego)
Tamara Kneese (University of San Francisco)
Kristy Milland (McMaster University and TurkerNation)
Victoria O’Meara (Western University)
Noopur​​ Raval (University of California Irvine)
Tech Workers Coalition
Jamie Woodcock (University of Oxford)

Full schedule available at this link

Faculty of Information, 140 St. George Street, Toronto, Room 728.

Attendance is free. Please register at this link.

The conference is organized by the McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology and its working group on platform labour. It is co-sponsored by the ICCIT (Institute for Communication, Culture, Information and Technology) and the University of Toronto Mississauga.

Of Mancaves and Basements: Mapping Gender in Meatspace

Of Mancaves and Basements: Mapping Gender in Meatspace

The “Monday Night Seminar” carries on the tradition of Marsall McLuhan’s public seminars at the University of Toronto. All seminars take place from 6 – 8pm within the same intimate Coach House setting where McLuhan once held court. In this up-close and personal environment, a range of thinkers – academics, activists, scientists, artists, designers and planners – will explore digital culture from a feminist perspective.

The Monday Night Seminars are designed to challenge prevailing cultural notions about technology and provoke new insight on the possibilities for a more equitable technological future. Join us!

Monday Night Seminar February 5th: Of Mancaves and Basements: Mapping Gender in Meatspace

Join us in exploring gender in popular culture and the gaming community. With special guests Florence M. Chee (Loyola University Chicago), in conversation with Nicholas Taylor (North Carolina State University) and Emily Flynn-Jones.

Click here to to sign up on Eventbrite!

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Florence M. Chee: PhD, Assistant Professor at Loyola University Chicago, Director of SIMLab

Dr. Florence Chee is Assistant Professor of Digital Communication and Director of the Social & Interactive Media Lab (SIMLab) at Loyola University Chicago. Her research examines the social and ethical dimensions of emergent digital lifestyles with a particular focus on games, social media, mobile platforms, and translating those insights across industrial, governmental, and academic sectors. She has designed and taught graduate/undergraduate courses in Digital Media including Game Studies, where students engage with debates surrounding diversity, intersectionality and media production through social justice frameworks. She is a faculty affiliate of the Center for Digital Ethics and Policy. For inquiries by email, contact: fchee@luc.edu.

Dr. Nicholas Thiel Taylor: Assistant Professor at North Carolina State University

Dr. Taylor’s work applies critical, feminist and materialist perspectives to experimental research with digital gaming communities. In particular, he is interested in the intersections of subjectivity, communicative practice, technologies and games, as enacted through both game production and play across a variety of contexts. Currently Dr. Taylor is conducting an exploratory study of masculinity as mediated via domestic spaces of male play – “man caves”. This work is supported by ReFiguring Innovation in Games (ReFiG), a SSHRC-funded international project aimed at encouraging greater diversity and inclusivity in gaming. He is also Associate Director of the PhD program in Communication, Rhetoric and Digital Media (CRDM) at NC State University.

Emily Flynn-Jones: Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Game Design and Development

With a PhD in New Media Cultures from the University of South Wales (2013), as well as the Banting Fellowship (2014), Emily Flynn-Jones’s work focuses on gender equity in gaming as well as discourses about inclusion in gaming communities. Her current work is more practical in nature, leading teams of students to develop serious games for the Ontario Ministry and the Escape Room World Championships as well as running game making workshops for single mothers. Whether researching, teaching or creating intersectional feminism is her guiding principle.​

 

 

Monday Night Seminar: Media Labours of Love

Monday Night Seminar: Media Labours of Love

The “Monday Night Seminar” carries on the tradition of Marshall McLuhan’s public seminars at the University of Toronto. This year’s thematic is MsUnderstanding Media.  All seminars take place from 6 – 8pm within the same intimate Coach House setting where McLuhan once held court. In this up-close and personal environment, a range of thinkers – academics, activists, scientists, artists, designers and planners – will explore digital culture from a feminist perspective.

The Monday Night Seminars are designed to challenge prevailing cultural notions about technology and provoke new insight on the possibilities for a more equitable technological future. Join us!

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Monday Night Seminar January 22nd: Media Labours of Love

With special guests Brooke Erin Duffy (Cornell University) featuring her new book “(Not) Getting Paid to Do What You Love: Gender, Social Media, and Aspirational Work” (2017), in conversation with Jenna Jacobson (Ryerson University) and Leslie Shade (University of Toronto.

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Brooke Erin Duffy: Assistant Professor at Cornell University.

Brooke Erin Duffy conducts research at the intersection of media, culture, and technology; her interests include social media production; media and creative industries; digital labor; and gender and feminist media studies. She holds a Ph.D. in communication from the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication.

Leslie Shade: Professor and Associate Dean at the iSchool at the University of Toronto.

Leslie Regan Shade’s research focus since the mid-1990’s has been on the social and policy aspects of information and communication technologies (ICTs), with particular concerns towards issues of gender, youth and political economy. Her research promotes the notion of the public interest in ICT policy; publications, community outreach and student supervision have as their goal the promotion of a wider popular discourse on information and communication policy issues and media reform in Canada and internationally for a diverse public and policy audience. This includes an ongoing commitment to building participatory scholar-activist networks.

Jenna Jacobson: Postdoctoral Fellow at Ryerson University in the Social Media Lab.

Jenna Jacobson completed her PhD at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Information, in 2017. Situated in the influencer economy and professional community management, her doctoral research critically analyzed the changing landscape of work and self-presentation in an age of social media. Her postdoctoral research focuses on how privacy and ethics are perceived by social media users in relation to how their data can be mined by third parties. She is also a Chair of the International Conference on Social Media & Society.

Monday Night Seminar: Data Justice Across Environmental Publics

Monday Night Seminar: Data Justice Across Environmental Publics

The “Monday Night Seminar” carries on the tradition of Marshall McLuhan’s public seminars at the University of Toronto. All seminars take place from 6 – 8pm within the same intimate Coach House setting where McLuhan once held court. In this up-close and personal environment, a range of thinkers – academics, activists, scientists, artists, designers and planners – will explore digital culture from a feminist perspective.

The Monday Night Seminars are designed to challenge prevailing cultural notions about technology and provoke new insight on the possibilities for a more equitable technological future. Join us!

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Monday Night Seminar November 27th: Data Justice Across Environmental Publics

Prototyping Data Justice across Environmental and Data Publics: Privacy, Precarity, and Resistance

How do we build decolonial futures into data infrastructures? This seminar addresses data justice as an emerging zone of creation and politics. We will discuss frame works of data justice in relation to modes of refusal, consent, and reparation. We speak to issues of environmental justice, open data, and smart city technology as critical contemporary sites of risk and opportunity. Key to this discussion are the politics of surveillance in relation to positions of precarity (racialized, gendered, community). Join us in prototyping a vision of data justice and strategies of resistance. As part of the seminar, we will use design charrette methods to workshop the concepts we develop. Come participate!

With special guests Dr. Beth Coleman (University of Waterloo) and Michelle Murphy (University of Toronto) leading the Technoscience Salon.

6 to 8 PM, Monday, November 27, 2017. Please RSVP at this link.

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Dr. Beth Coleman: Associate Professor of Experimental Digita Media at the University of Waterloo where she directs the City as Platform Lab.

Dr. Beth Colemans work focuses on smart technology, big data, and civic engagement. Her practice engages research methods and artistic inquiry towards the creation of public, civic, and poetic works. She is the co-founder of SoundLab Cultural Alchemy, an internationally acclaimed multimedia art and sound platform. She had published the monograph Hello Avatar (MIT Press) along with numerous research articles. Her research affiliations include executive committee member of the UWaterloo Games Institute, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University, and expert consultant for the European Commission Digital Futures. She is a founding member of the Microsoft Research Fellow Social Media Collective and currently a visiting professor at Data & Society Research Institute, New York.

Michelle Murphy: Professor of History and Women and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto.

Michelle Murphy’s research is in feminist science and technology studies with a focus on environmental, reproductive, and data justice. Her current work concerns decolonial chemical exposures on the lower Great Lakes and Environmental Data Justice. She is director of the Technoscience Research Unit, a co-founding member of the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative, co-organizer of the Technoscience Salon, lead member of Endocrine Disruptor Action Group, and a Lead Editor of the journal Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience. She is the author of The Economization of Life (2017), Seizing the Means of Reproduction (2012), and Sick Building Syndrome and the Politics of Exposure (2006), all with Duke University Press.

Monday Night Seminar: Algorithmic Frictions

Monday Night Seminar: Algorithmic Frictions

The “Monday Night Seminar” carries on the tradition of Marsall McLuhan’s public seminars at the University of Toronto. All seminars take place from 6 – 8pm within the same intimate Coach House setting where McLuhan once held court. In this up-close and personal environment, a range of thinkers – academics, activists, scientists, artists, designers and planners – will explore digital culture from a feminist perspective.

The Monday Night Seminars are designed to challenge prevailing cultural notions about technology and provoke new insight on the possibilities for a more equitable technological future. Join us!

Algorithmic Power 

Join us for an evening as we discuss the frictions are generated by the algorithmic power that underpins platform-based labour

With special guests Safiya Noble (USC) and Tero Karppi (UofT). The seminar will be moderated by Rianka Singh (UofT)

6 to 8 PM, Monday, November 13, 2017. Please RSVP at this.

Safiya Umoja Noble is an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California (USC) Annenberg School of Communication. Noble’s research focuses on the design of digital media platforms on the internet and their impact on society. Her work is both sociological and interdisciplinary, marking the ways that digital media impacts and intersects with issues of race, gender, culture, and technology design. Her monograph on racist and sexist algorithmic bias in commercial search engines is entitled Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism (forthcoming, NYU Press).

Tero Karppi, PhD, is an assistant professor at ICCIT, University of Toronto Mississauga. Karppi explores the edges of connectivity and his research has been published in journals such as Theory, Culture, and Society, Fibreculture, and International Journal of Cultural Studies. Karppi’s book Disconnect: Facebook and Social Media’s Affective Bonds is contracted with University of Minnesota press and forthcoming in 2018.

October 30 – Monday Night Seminar: Automating Injustice

October 30 – Monday Night Seminar: Automating Injustice

TSA Scanners/Data Mining Social Movements/Police Body-cams. Join us for an evening as we discuss the cultural and the technical aspects of how injustice gets embedded in our machines.

With special guests Armond Towns (University of Denver) and Rachel Hall (Syracuse University) in conversation with U of T’s Alex Hanna (Assistant Professor ICCIT) and Rhonda McEwen (Canada Research Chair in Tactile Interfaces, Communication and Cognition and Association Professor ICCIT).

6-8 PM, October 30, 2017. Please RSVP at this link.

Rachel Hall: Associate Professor Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies, Syracuse University

Rachel Hall’s research is in feminist surveillance studies, security studies, and risk management. Her work interrogates the processes by which people come to embrace new technologies and strategies as solutions to culturally and historically specific constructions of fear, insecurity, and risk. She is the author of The Transparent Traveler: The Performance and Culture of Airport Security, under contract with Duke University Press 2014.

Alex Hanna: Assistant Professor at the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology

Alex’s research agenda focuses on how new and social media has changed social movement mobilization and political participation. She relies on large-scale data collections and computational tools in my research, with an emphasis on automated textual analysis and machine learning.Her current project is the Machine-learning Protest Event Data System (MPEDS), a system which uses machine learning and natural language processing to create protest event data. She is involved in several efforts to integrate computational methods into social science practice and education. She has taught workshops on computer programming and data analysis for social scientists, and also co-founded the computational social science blog Bad Hessian. She is also an activist, working on issues of queer and transgender inclusion in sports and higher education, and access to transgender health care.

Rhonda McEwen is Associate Professor at the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology and at University of Toronto iSchool.

She is Canada Research Chair in Tactile Interfaces, Communication and Cognition. Her research and teaching centre around information practices involving new media technologies, with an emphasis on mobile and tablet communication, new media, social networks, and sensory information processing. McEwen’s research was the covered by the CBS newsmagazine 60 Minutes in 2012 and 2013. Her recent publications appear in the journals Information, Communication & Society, Computers and Education, Learning & Instruction, New Media and Society, and Library and Information Science Research.

Armond Towns is Assistant Professor of Culture and Communication.

He is increasingly interested in “Man’s” representation in both science and philosophy. This leads Professor Towns to examine the intersections between race, gender, sexuality, class, time, and space. Thus, his areas of study include, but are not limited to, black radicalism, media and cultural studies, post- and decolonial studies, the philosophy and science of race, feminist and queer geography, and political economy. His research can be found in Social Identities: Journal for the Study of Race, Nation and Culture, Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, and Women’s Studies in Communication. Continue reading