Monday Night Seminar: Data Justice Across Environmental Publics

Monday Night Seminar: Data Justice Across Environmental Publics

The “Monday Night Seminar” carries on the tradition of Marshall McLuhan’s public seminars at the University of Toronto. All seminars take place from 6 – 8pm within the same intimate Coach House setting where McLuhan once held court. In this up-close and personal environment, a range of thinkers – academics, activists, scientists, artists, designers and planners – will explore digital culture from a feminist perspective.

The Monday Night Seminars are designed to challenge prevailing cultural notions about technology and provoke new insight on the possibilities for a more equitable technological future. Join us!

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Monday Night Seminar November 27th: Data Justice Across Environmental Publics

Prototyping Data Justice across Environmental and Data Publics: Privacy, Precarity, and Resistance

How do we build decolonial futures into data infrastructures? This seminar addresses data justice as an emerging zone of creation and politics. We will discuss frame works of data justice in relation to modes of refusal, consent, and reparation. We speak to issues of environmental justice, open data, and smart city technology as critical contemporary sites of risk and opportunity. Key to this discussion are the politics of surveillance in relation to positions of precarity (racialized, gendered, community). Join us in prototyping a vision of data justice and strategies of resistance. As part of the seminar, we will use design charrette methods to workshop the concepts we develop. Come participate!

With special guests Dr. Beth Coleman (University of Waterloo) and Michelle Murphy (University of Toronto) leading the Technoscience Salon.

6 to 8 PM, Monday, November 27, 2017. Please RSVP at this link.

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Dr. Beth Coleman: Associate Professor of Experimental Digita Media at the University of Waterloo where she directs the City as Platform Lab.

Dr. Beth Colemans work focuses on smart technology, big data, and civic engagement. Her practice engages research methods and artistic inquiry towards the creation of public, civic, and poetic works. She is the co-founder of SoundLab Cultural Alchemy, an internationally acclaimed multimedia art and sound platform. She had published the monograph Hello Avatar (MIT Press) along with numerous research articles. Her research affiliations include executive committee member of the UWaterloo Games Institute, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University, and expert consultant for the European Commission Digital Futures. She is a founding member of the Microsoft Research Fellow Social Media Collective and currently a visiting professor at Data & Society Research Institute, New York.

Michelle Murphy: Professor of History and Women and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto.

Michelle Murphy’s research is in feminist science and technology studies with a focus on environmental, reproductive, and data justice. Her current work concerns decolonial chemical exposures on the lower Great Lakes and Environmental Data Justice. She is director of the Technoscience Research Unit, a co-founding member of the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative, co-organizer of the Technoscience Salon, lead member of Endocrine Disruptor Action Group, and a Lead Editor of the journal Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience. She is the author of The Economization of Life (2017), Seizing the Means of Reproduction (2012), and Sick Building Syndrome and the Politics of Exposure (2006), all with Duke University Press.

Monday Night Seminar: Algorithmic Frictions

Monday Night Seminar: Algorithmic Frictions

The “Monday Night Seminar” carries on the tradition of Marsall McLuhan’s public seminars at the University of Toronto. All seminars take place from 6 – 8pm within the same intimate Coach House setting where McLuhan once held court. In this up-close and personal environment, a range of thinkers – academics, activists, scientists, artists, designers and planners – will explore digital culture from a feminist perspective.

The Monday Night Seminars are designed to challenge prevailing cultural notions about technology and provoke new insight on the possibilities for a more equitable technological future. Join us!

Algorithmic Power 

Join us for an evening as we discuss the frictions are generated by the algorithmic power that underpins platform-based labour

With special guests Safiya Noble (USC) and Tero Karppi (UofT). The seminar will be moderated by Rianka Singh (UofT)

6 to 8 PM, Monday, November 13, 2017. Please RSVP at this.

Safiya Umoja Noble is an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California (USC) Annenberg School of Communication. Noble’s research focuses on the design of digital media platforms on the internet and their impact on society. Her work is both sociological and interdisciplinary, marking the ways that digital media impacts and intersects with issues of race, gender, culture, and technology design. Her monograph on racist and sexist algorithmic bias in commercial search engines is entitled Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism (forthcoming, NYU Press).

Tero Karppi, PhD, is an assistant professor at ICCIT, University of Toronto Mississauga. Karppi explores the edges of connectivity and his research has been published in journals such as Theory, Culture, and Society, Fibreculture, and International Journal of Cultural Studies. Karppi’s book Disconnect: Facebook and Social Media’s Affective Bonds is contracted with University of Minnesota press and forthcoming in 2018.

October 30 – Monday Night Seminar: Automating Injustice

October 30 – Monday Night Seminar: Automating Injustice

TSA Scanners/Data Mining Social Movements/Police Body-cams. Join us for an evening as we discuss the cultural and the technical aspects of how injustice gets embedded in our machines.

With special guests Armond Towns (University of Denver) and Rachel Hall (Syracuse University) in conversation with U of T’s Alex Hanna (Assistant Professor ICCIT) and Rhonda McEwen (Canada Research Chair in Tactile Interfaces, Communication and Cognition and Association Professor ICCIT).

6-8 PM, October 30, 2017. Please RSVP at this link.

Rachel Hall: Associate Professor Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies, Syracuse University

Rachel Hall’s research is in feminist surveillance studies, security studies, and risk management. Her work interrogates the processes by which people come to embrace new technologies and strategies as solutions to culturally and historically specific constructions of fear, insecurity, and risk. She is the author of The Transparent Traveler: The Performance and Culture of Airport Security, under contract with Duke University Press 2014.

Alex Hanna: Assistant Professor at the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology

Alex’s research agenda focuses on how new and social media has changed social movement mobilization and political participation. She relies on large-scale data collections and computational tools in my research, with an emphasis on automated textual analysis and machine learning.Her current project is the Machine-learning Protest Event Data System (MPEDS), a system which uses machine learning and natural language processing to create protest event data. She is involved in several efforts to integrate computational methods into social science practice and education. She has taught workshops on computer programming and data analysis for social scientists, and also co-founded the computational social science blog Bad Hessian. She is also an activist, working on issues of queer and transgender inclusion in sports and higher education, and access to transgender health care.

Rhonda McEwen is Associate Professor at the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology and at University of Toronto iSchool.

She is Canada Research Chair in Tactile Interfaces, Communication and Cognition. Her research and teaching centre around information practices involving new media technologies, with an emphasis on mobile and tablet communication, new media, social networks, and sensory information processing. McEwen’s research was the covered by the CBS newsmagazine 60 Minutes in 2012 and 2013. Her recent publications appear in the journals Information, Communication & Society, Computers and Education, Learning & Instruction, New Media and Society, and Library and Information Science Research.

Armond Towns is Assistant Professor of Culture and Communication.

He is increasingly interested in “Man’s” representation in both science and philosophy. This leads Professor Towns to examine the intersections between race, gender, sexuality, class, time, and space. Thus, his areas of study include, but are not limited to, black radicalism, media and cultural studies, post- and decolonial studies, the philosophy and science of race, feminist and queer geography, and political economy. His research can be found in Social Identities: Journal for the Study of Race, Nation and Culture, Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, and Women’s Studies in Communication. Continue reading